The DC Food Truck Association needs your help in asking Mayor Gray to not limit the amount of food trucks allowed to serve downtown.  The rules are vague (mentioned in the press release below) and give DDOT a lot of latitude in preventing food trucks from serving at all of the popular spots, including Farragut and L’Enfant.  Can you imagine only 3 food trucks ever being allowed to serve at one time at Farragut Square?

The DCFTA outlines three ways to let your voice be heard:

1) Over www.RulesThatWork.org

2) By e-mail to DCVendingRegs@dc.gov

3) By letter to Mr. Helder Gil, Legislative Affairs Specialist, Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs, 1100 Fourth Street, SW, Room 5164, Washington, D.C. 20024

Comments are due by 5 p.m. on Tuesday, November 13, 2012.

The press release follows (click the more.. link, if applicable). 

Tell Mayor Gray: We Need Food Truck Rules That Work!

Proposed D.C. Regulations Threaten Food Trucks Downtown

The Food Truck Association today asked supporters to tell Mayor Vincent Gray his proposed regulations grant too much power to unelected regulators to decide where food trucks can and cannot be and imposes unreasonable and vague restrictions on street vending – threatening food trucks downtown.

Supporters can find more information and write Mayor Gray at www.RulesThatWork.org.

“Mayor Gray’s proposed new food truck regulations threaten to limit consumer choice, competition and hurt the entire D.C. food truck industry,” said Che Ruddell-Tabisola, executive director of the Food Truck Association and Co-Owner of the BBQ Bus food truck. “Regulations should be clear, tailored to address specific needs and make common sense.

“We need food truck rules that work.”

 

Mayor Gray’s proposed rules, which were published on Oct. 5, grant new, sweeping powers to unelected District Department of Transportation officials to decide where food trucks can and cannot vend.

Under the proposed regulations, the government would pick and choose the limited number of locations where trucks can vend by establishing Mobile Roadway Vending locations. Although these locations are good news for the few trucks that can snag a spot, other food truck vendors will undoubtedly be forced out of downtown. The proposed rules would even limit food trucks from vending on opposite sides of the same street.

The proposal would also restrict food trucks from serving their customers if there is less than 10 feet of “unobstructed” sidewalk. But the regulations do not specify what qualifies as an “obstruction,” threatening food trucks downtown. Applying an arbitrary and unnecessary width restriction would eliminate good vending locations for no valid reason.

“We support common-sense approaches to balancing the many needs and uses of public space,” said Mike Lenard, a Food Truck Association board member and owner of the TaKorean food truck. “But Mayor Gray’s proposed food truck regulations fall short of this goal.”

“Food trucks are offering our customers variety and great cuisine at great prices, adding to the vibrancy of downtown and creating hundreds of jobs. These benefits could be lost if Mayor Gray’s proposal was adopted,” Lenard added.

Comments can be submitted:

Over www.RulesThatWork.org

By e-mail to DCVendingRegs@dc.gov

By letter to Mr. Helder Gil, Legislative Affairs Specialist, Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs, 1100 Fourth Street, SW, Room 5164, Washington, D.C. 20024

 

Comments are due by 5 p.m. on Tuesday, November 13, 2012.

About the Food Truck Association

The Food Truck Association is a group of more than 50 local food truck owner-operators. We seek to sustain the wellbeing of our industry, foster a sense of community and work in partnership to improve food truck regulations. We are engaged community members who deeply care about our city and believe in working together to make a positive impact. The Food Truck Association’s signature event is the Curbside Cookoff food truck festival series. For more information visit www.DCFoodTrucks.org.